Enabler

Social Impact

Creating a digital 3D simulation training for disability support workers.

Enabler uses 3D simulation mobile gaming technology to create engaging, interactive and highly effective training and assessment to address the widespread skills shortages in the disability and aged care workforce.

Users play ‘serious games’ to practice applying knowledge in realistic and challenging scenarios, allowing them to learn by making mistakes and experiencing the consequences of their actions in a safe environment. Enabler’s platform combines the principles of game design, mobile app technology, best-practice content and sophisticated data analytics to make high impact training scalable, affordable and accessible. We’re a company run by people with disability, for people with disability, to increase inclusion and accessibility in the community.

MAP Launch Pitch

Team Bios

Huy Nguyen

CEO

Huy is a humanitarian engineer and social entrepreneur. Contracting polio as an infant, his own experience with disability has given him a unique mindset when approaching real-world social challenges.

Huy sees that disability services need to move beyond charity models and operate as businesses to drive change. Recognising the great need for more skilled disability support workers, he has established the social enterprise Enabler, which uses video game technology to create portable, scenario-based training for disability and aged care workers. The 3D simulation platform is built to deliver scalable, high-quality training without compromising on engagement, depth and quality, unlike traditional online training.

His work throughout the Asia-Pacific region has been recognised with numerous awards, including ACT Young Australian of the Year 2014, Australia National Disability Awards 2013 and Australian National University Young Alumnus of the Year 2014.

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